Office 365 Update for October 2017

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Microsoft finally starts doing something with LinkedIn by integrating it into Office 365

 Last year, Microsoft bought LinkedIn for $26.2 billion, but even though the acquisition has long closed, Microsoft hasn’t yet done much with all of the data it gets from the social network. At its Ignite conference in Orlando, Florida, the company announced some first steps in integrating LinkedIn’s social graph with its Office products.

Now don’t get too excited yet. What we’re talking about here is the integration of LinkedIn data with Office 365 profile cards. So assuming you don’t know much about your professional contacts and colleagues yet, you can now see more information about them right in Office 365 without having to go to their LinkedIn profiles (and potentially showing up as that one person who looked at their LinkedIn profile that week, which will surely trigger yet another LinkedIn email for them). Continue reading

How the 9-to-5 workday has disappeared

 Work has changed dramatically over the last few decades, according to a report in The Wall Street Journal — it’s become more time-consuming, less stable, and more flexible. In 1973, 6% of Americans said they worked excessive hours; in 2016, 26% said they worked more than 48 hours a week. Insurance coverage by employers has also dropped since 1973, although companies now provide more benefits to aid work-life balance, such as paid parental leave and remote work options. Businesses are spending less on employees, both in terms of compensation and capital investment, while investors get triple the payout from 30 years ago. This has all contributed to workers increasingly acting like free agents in the job market; while they have more control and flexibility, the “safety net that once came with full-time work has frayed.” • Have you been impacted by these changes?